Summit Search Group

Five Common Hiring Mistakes

At some point, every company struggles with their hiring process. When you need to find new employees to add value to your company, searching can be extremely time intensive and it can easily exhaust your company’s capabilities.

Good hires are sometimes hard to come by, but they’re not impossible to find. It simply requires a well-designed search and hiring process. A recruitment agency, like Summit Search, can be an excellent resource to help you find qualified candidates for the position you’re looking to fill.

That being said, access to qualified candidates is simply the first step in the hiring process. Next you have to sort through those candidates, invite some in for an in-person interview, and ultimately make a selection that you think will be best for your company.

When it comes to hiring new people, many companies aren’t maximizing their efforts without even realizing it. If you’re struggling to find the right people to boost your company’s overall productivity and efficiency, you need to be sure you’re conducting your interview process in the most effective manner possible.

Here are a few common mistakes that many companies make when trying to hire a new employee:

Hiring Friends and Family

Whenever a position opens up in any company, there will always be a good number of existing employees eager to volunteer a close friend or family member as the “perfect” candidate to fill the opening. If the existing employee is a valued member of your company, it can be incredibly tempting to take their recommendation and hire friends or family members.

Smaller companies struggle with this problem much more than larger corporations. It must be noted that a close relationship with an existing employee doesn’t mean that person automatically qualifies them as a good potential fit for the open position. Companies need to be careful to do their due diligence, regardless of any connections a potential employee has within your company.

Trusting First Impressions

It’s easy to label a candidate as “perfect” based on their paper resume or an initial interview. However, first impressions can often be misleading. Companies should be careful not to hire based on whether or not they like or get along with a particular candidate. Instead, it makes more sense to look at the candidates’ strengths and match them up against the responsibilities required for the position in question. This will help you hire someone that’s truly qualified for the position, rather than simply going with your gut.

Asking the Wrong Questions

Misleading or discriminatory questions can quickly get hiring managers into hot water. Most managers are aware that there is a distinct set of questions that are off-limit during interviews. Most of these questions pertain to age, ethnicity, religion, and other personal topics.

There are also seemingly innocent questions that can easily get hiring managers into trouble, especially if you end up refusing employment to that candidate. Be careful not to ask questions that delve too deeply into someone’s personal life.

Not Thoroughly Vetting Candidates

As mentioned above, it’s unwise to hire a new employee based on an impressive resume alone. Companies should take the time to conduct thorough background checks on every potential employee before hiring them. Also, calling previous employers is a great way to get a more objective opinion of the candidate in question.

Having an Unclear Hiring Policy

This may seem obvious, but if your company doesn’t have a clear-cut, well-communicated hiring policy, you’re most likely going to fail in finding the right candidate to fill your open position. A clear policy will help managers avoid hiring issues or legal troubles.

As you can see, an effective hiring process can be a bit complicated. However, using the aforementioned tips will help you maximize your interview efforts and eventually settle on a candidate that will be the best fit for your company.

 

Sources

http://www.businessnewsdaily.com/5827-employer-hiring-mistakes.html